Patient Resources

 

Planning and Preparation

Prior to your procedure, an Anesthesiologist or CRNA will perform a directed history and physical exam, discuss the risks and benefits of anesthesia, and formulate an anesthetic plan tailored to your needs. We encourage you to ask questions to ensure you fully understand your anesthetic plan. A member of our team will continuously monitor your safety and comfort throughout your procedure.

Types of Anesthesia

General Anesthesia - This anesthesia involves intravenous and inhaled anesthetic and produces total loss of consciousness. It requires breathing support, often with a temporary breathing tube.
 
Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia - This anesthesia involves injecting local anesthetic into the spinal fluid or around the nerves as they leave the spine and produces temporary loss of sensation and strength in the legs and abdomen. It is used for operations on the low abdomen or legs and is often coupled with intravenous sedation.
 
Major Nerve Block - This anesthesia involves injecting local anesthetic around major nerve clusters, usually under the guidance of ultrasound, in order to numb your operative location (i.e. arm, leg, or low abdomen). It can be coupled with general anesthesia or intravenous sedation.
 
‚ÄčIntravenous Regional Anesthesia (Bier Block) ‚Äč- This anesthesia involves injecting local anesthetic into the vein of the hand and preventing its spread beyond the arm via a tourniquet. It numbs the hand and arm for surgical operation on this region and is often coupled with intravenous sedation.
 
Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC) - This anesthesia is given through an IV and provides comfort and sedation but maintains your ability to breathe spontaneously.